In this tutorial we’ll look at going from a 2D render (top) to a stereo cubemap image (bottom). Rhino file courtesy Spector Group.
In this tutorial we’ll look at going from a 2D render (top) to a stereo cubemap image (bottom).

This is the fourth in a series of tutorials designed to help you use your favorite software and favorite rendering engine to output 360 panoramas. If Sketchup is your software of choice and V-ray is your rendering engine of choice, this is the tutorial for you. Other 360 tutorials for other rendering engines will continue to be posted in the coming weeks, and there are already tutorials on Rhino and 3ds Max.

Welcome! In this tutorial, we’re going to help you take a scene you’ve already set up for V-ray rendering in Sketchup, make a few adjustments, and render out a cubemap image viewable in 360 and VR. We’ll finish by uploading the image to Vizor 360 and viewing it in a VR headset.


Check out the finished project in Vizor 360 below to get an idea of how it looks.

 

Setting up V-ray for 360

First, create or select a saved view in the scene. In the bottom right, you’ll see the current height of the person.

Choose or create a view at a standard height.
Choose or create a view at a standard height.

Now, set your view to an average height if it is not already. Because of the sense of presence afforded by virtual reality, it can be jarring for someone to feel too short or too tall. But what height to pick? Well, anyone who is tall was once short, but anyone who is short has never been tall. 1.68m or 5’-6” is a good default if you plan on showing your panorama to many people.


If you plan to create multiple panoramas and build a tour, pick a direction for all of your views to face in order to create consistency. The easiest way to do this is to use the Advanced Camera Tools to make the scene views into physical, movable cameras. This can be done by manually creating a new camera and adjusting it as needed, or simply selecting “Create Camera” while in the view you want, then going to a Top view in Wireframe mode to rotate it. Note that view rotation won’t affect the content of the render, only the starting view direction (this can also be manually changed in Vizor).

If you’re building a tour with multiple camera points, create Cameras and give them consistent height and rotation.
If you’re building a tour with multiple camera points, create Cameras and give them consistent height and rotation.

Next, open the V-ray Asset Editor, choose “Settings”, and change the camera type to “VR Cubemap.”

If you want to render a stereo (VR) image instead of just a 360 image, make sure to click the “Stereo” toggle to turn it on. If you are unable to select this toggle, check to see if the “Interactive” toggle isn’t on in the “Renderer” section of the Asset Editor.

Now, set the image height to “1536,” and confirm that this automatically changed the width to “9216”, make sure the Output Layout is set to “Side by Side”, and pick a place to save the image.

Key settings in V-ray Asset Editor
 

That’s it! Now press Render, and you should see 12 square images being rendered in a row, the first 6 for the left eye, the second 6 for the right eye, each square at 1536x1536.

To share your image on the web or create a virtual tour, use the Vizor 360 editor, which will allow you to link scenes, annotate your images and more.


For general tips and tricks on creating a 360 Tour on the web, check out this article.
 

Responses